“We are meant to share our lives with each other and work for the common good”

The Holy Trinity, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, is one God but three persons. How can one God be three persons? Too often we ask the wrong question. Rather, we should ask, what does the dogma of the Trinity say about our purpose in life?

Shield of Faith, ©Lawrence Klimecki

Think back to the best times of your life, those experiences you always carry with you. These are the memories you cherish. Were there other people there with you? Now think back to the worst times, those days when it seemed like the whole world was against you. Were you alone?

We are made in the image and likeness of God, but rather than try to determine what this says about God, let us think for a moment about what it says about us.

The Holy Trinity is one of our greatest mysteries. This does not mean that we know nothing about the nature of God. It does mean that we can know only what God has revealed to us. And He has revealed to us that He is made up of three blessed persons, Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Our God is a community of three persons, a community based on love. The love between God the Father and God the Son is so great that it becomes a third person, the Holy Spirit. As we are made in the likeness of God, we are a people of community based on love. We are meant to share our lives with each other and work for the common good, building up the Body of Christ, the Church.

This is a lifelong task, a task we we learn and grow into throughout our lives. A task that requires humility and patience.

At the last supper, Jesus tells His followers that the world will hate them. He is preparing them for the trials that lie ahead. But then He stops, He has much more to tell them but sees that they are having a hard time understanding His words. So He stops speaking, leaving the Holy Spirit to guide them.

God waited almost two thousand years from the time of Abraham to send the Messiah. He waited four hundred years before sending Moses to deliver the Hebrews from Egypt.

We live in a fallen world, and very often, God’s wisdom translates into patience. Wisdom knows how to wait. God adjusts His plans to accommodate our fallen nature.

It takes time for us to become saints, to grow as mature Christians. It takes time for God’s grace to penetrate our hearts.

God is patient with us, how easily we take His patience for granted.

If God is patient, we should also be. We should be patient with ourselves as we learn to follow the example Jesus set for us. And we should be patient with others, reaching out to our brothers and sisters in small ways, allowing time to win them over.

Jesus tells us that the first and greatest commandment is to love God with all our heart. But the second is like it, we are to love one another as we love ourselves. If we can learn to be patient with ourselves, we can learn to be patient with others.

The greatest service we can do for others is to show them God’s love, mercy, and grace, no matter how long it takes.

Pax Vobiscum
The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

© Lawrence Klimecki

Lawrence Klimecki, MSA, is a deacon in the Diocese of Sacramento. He is a public speaker, writer, and artist, reflecting on the intersection of art and faith and the spiritual “hero’s journey” that is part of every person’s life. He maintains a blog at www.DeaconLawrence.org and can be reached at Lawrence@deaconlawrence.com